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Full text of "Flora Indica Vol-I"

68                                         FLORA   INDICA.
tute the only herbarium of importance to which we have failed
to procure access, and we are tence unable to do our friend
that justice in the body of this work, to which, as the disco-
verer of many of the plants described, he is pre-eminently
entitled.
13. The only other extensive collection in Great Britain is
the Hookerian Herbarium, in which our work is carried on*
This is beyond all doubt both the richest $nd best-named her-
barium in the world, and it possesses the rare advantage of
containing an extensive series of specimens of each species
from many countries and collectors, so preserved and arranged
that all may be brought at one time under inspection. For
these reasons (and from the extreme liberality of its owner)
the Hookerian Herbarium has beeu studied by most mono-
graphists at home and abroad, and possesees in consequence
an enormous proportion of authentically-named specimens,
by Arnott, Asa Gray, Bentham, Boott, Choisy, Decaisne, De
Vriese, Grisebach, Herbert, Lehnmnn, Liebmann, Lindley,
Meisaer, Miers, Miquel, Mo<iuin-raiidon, Meyer, Munro,
Nees von Escnbeck, etc. etc., and illustrates the published
works of these and many other botanists, to an extent that
no other herbarium does. It is also enriched with many va-
luable manuscript notes, dissections, sketches, and remarks
by its possessor, and by Iff. Planchon, who was for some
years its curator. It would be out of place here to give a
history of the rise and progress of the? Hookerian Herbarium,
or of the sources from which it is mainly derived; though
this would form a most interesting contribution to the litera-
ture of the science, and would include & history of the progress
of systematic and descriptive botany during the last half-cen-
tury: It is especially rich in'Indian plants; and an enumera-
tion of these, which is necessary, as they constitute a large
part of our materials, will give the reader an idea of the na-
ture of the abundant sources from wluch its riches are de-
rived. The Indian portion of the IJookerian Herbarium com-
prises the undermentioned collections.